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Gardening | Activities for the Kids

There are loads of activities for kids to enjoy in the garden, which also have a close link with the school science and nature curriculum. Here are some great ideas to get your kids, big and small, out in the fresh air, growing their own plants and food and using nature’s resources to create their own activities. 

Inspiration and Ideas

Child holding a pile of soil with a flower growing out of it
Little Green Thumbs

Have a look at this resource from BBC, about great tips to get your little ones involved in the garden.

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Child building a mini garden in a glass bowl
Create your own mini garden

Create your own mini garden, using items that you find on a scavenger hunt (feathers, shells, stones & plants). Share your creations with us on social media!

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Person reusing plastic bottles in a planter
Gardening with Recyclables

You don’t need to get new items delivered from a garden centre to start your seed growing, here's several household items you can use to start your journey. 

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Do a wildlife survey in your garden, to see what types of animals and insects visit your garden during the day! Keep a notepad to hand near a window, to record animals at different times of the day.

Foxes and badgers are nocturnal, so will be active at night. See if you can find out the names of the birds in your garden. Use a camera to take a picture in case they fly away, so then you can research what type of bird they are, what they eat, how they make their nests.

Have a read about what types of wildlife visit Kew Gardens and see if you have any of the same animals that visit your garden

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Trees for Cities is the only national UK charity working to improve lives by planting urban trees in towns and cities across the country. They love to get stuck in with communities, cultivating lasting change in local neighbourhoods by revitalising forgotten spaces and creating happier, healthier environments.

Edible Playgrounds is their flagship food-growing programme, which offers some great resources for teaching in school or at home. The charity is keen to develop even more practical gardening resources so they're keen to hear from CSSC members about what would be most useful.

You can contact the charity directly, check out the details on their website. They have launched a new partnership between themselves, Ecosia and the NHS Forest about planting trees in around NHS hospitals, to support the mental health and wellbeing of NHS staff across the UK.

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We often see bees buzzing from one flower to another during the summer months, but they have an important part in saving our planet. Bees get food from flowers and move the pollen from one flower to another flower.  

By creating a bee hotel, you can help to save numbers and give them somewhere safe to nest and grow. To create your own bee hotel follow the instructions below from the Royal Horticultural Society.

What you'll need
  • A terracotta plant pot (9 – 15cm in size)
  • Modelling clay
  • Plastic straws or bamboo canes
  • String
What to do
  1. Cut the straws or bamboo canes to a length that fits the depth of your pot. If you are using bamboo canes you will need a grown up to carry out this part as it’s tricky.
  2. Tie the bundle of straws or canes together with a piece of string.
  3. Place some modelling clay in the bottom of the pot and stick the bundle of straws or canes in to the clay.
  4. Place the pot horizontally in your garden in a quiet place for the bees to move in.

Watch this video, to understand why bees are so important.

What you'll need
  • A terracotta plant pot (9 – 15cm in size)
  • Modelling clay
  • Plastic straws or bamboo canes
  • String
What to do
  1. Personalise your own plant pot and paint or draw on your name and a pattern. If you use an old jam jar, you can then see how the seed is growing roots. 
  2. Think about what seed you’d like to grow. Good seeds for children are cress, sunflowers, peas or beans.
  3. Use a scoop to fill your pot with compost, count how many scoops out loud it takes to fill the pot.
  4. Take three or four seeds from the seed packet and gently push them into the soil, like you are tucking them into bed.
  5. Water the pot, with a gentle shower of water to help the seeds start to germinate.
  6. Write the name of the plant on a lolly stick to remember what you’re growing.
  7. Write a diary and take pictures or even draw a picture to record what happened each day.

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